Wednesday, April 03, 2019

Andrew Booker, a Mathematics Professor at the University of Bristol, Just Solved a Deceptively Simple Puzzle That Has Boggled Minds for 64 Years

A mathematician in England has cracked a math puzzle that's stumped computers and humans alike for 64 years: How can the number 33 be expressed as the sum of three cubed numbers?

While it might seem simple on its face, this question is part of an enduring number-theory conundrum that goes back to at least 1955 and may have been mulled over by Greek thinkers as early as the third century. The underlying equation to solve looks like this:

`x^3 + y^3 + z^3 = k`

That answer is:

`(8,866,128,975,287,528)^3 + (–8,778,405,442,862,239)^3 + (–2,736,111,468,807,040)^3 = 33`.

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Friday, March 22, 2019

Karen Uhlenbeck is first woman to win prestigious maths Abel prize

Mathematician Karen Uhlenbeck has become the first woman to win the Abel prize, sometimes called the Nobel prize of mathematics. She has been awarded the 6 million Norwegian kroner ($700,000) prize for her work in the fields of gauge theory and geometric analysis, which have been credited with far-reaching impact in both mathematics and physics.

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Sunday, January 13, 2019

Mathematician Sir Michael Atiyah dies aged 89


One of the world's foremost mathematicians, Prof Sir Michael Atiyah, has died at the age of 89.

Sir Michael, who worked at Cambridge University before he retired, made outstanding contributions to geometry and topology.

Sir Michael was a recipient of the highest honour in mathematics, a Fields Medal. He died on Friday.

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Thursday, January 03, 2019

51st Known Mersenne Prime Found!

The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) has discovered the largest known prime number, 282,589,933-1, having 24,862,048 digits. A computer volunteered by Patrick Laroche from Ocala, Florida made the find on December 7, 2018. The new prime number, also known as M82589933, is calculated by multiplying together 82,589,933 twos and then subtracting one. It is more than one and a half million digits larger than the previous record prime number.

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Monday, September 24, 2018

Riemann Hypothesis Solved By Sir Michael Atiyah After 160 Years, He Says

One of the world's most renowned mathematicians showed how he solved the 160-year-old Riemann hypothesis at a lecture on Monday — and he will be awarded $1 million if his solution is confirmed.

Sir Michael Atiyah, who has won the two biggest prizes in mathematics — the Fields Medal and Abel Prize — took the stage at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany on Monday to present his work.

To solve the hypothesis you need to find a way to predict the occurrence of every prime number, even though primes have historically been regarded as randomly distributed.

Aityah's solution will need to be checked by other mathematicians and then published before it is fully accepted and he can claim the prize from the Clay Mathematics Institute of Cambridge.

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Every Positive Integer Is A Sum Of Three Palindromes

For integer g ≥ 5, we prove that any positive integer can be written as a sum of three palindromes in base g.

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Wednesday, August 01, 2018

"Nobel of Mathematics" Stolen Minutes After Awarded

One of the winners of the award known as the Nobel Prize for mathematics had his gold medal stolen minutes after it was given to him. Caucher Birkar, a Kurdish refugee turned Cambridge University math professor, was among four winners of the prestigious Fields Medal on Wednesday in Rio de Janeiro.

It was an embarrassing debut for crime-ridden Rio, the first Latin American city ever to host the Fields ceremony, which takes place every four years. Less than an hour had passed since Birkar, a 40-year-old specialist in algebraic geometry, had been handed his 14-karat gold medal when his briefcase went missing.

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Friday, March 23, 2018

Creator of 'Grand Unified Theory of Mathematics' Wins Prestigious Math Prize

A mathematician who developed what some consider the "grand unified theory of mathematics" has won one of the most prestigious prizes in mathematics.

Robert Langlands, an emeritus professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, has won the Abel Prize, a prestigious mathematics prize that honors a lifetime of groundbreaking work, organizers of the prize announced yesterday (March 20).

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